Herman J. Radtke III

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Talks

Edge transformations: a primer on Fastly’s image optimization

Abstract: Today, a staggering 64% of all web traffic (62% on mobile) is image content. It therefore comes as no surprise that image optimization is the number one feature request by Fastly customers. The reason for this is very simple – Image optimization and delivery come with many pain points. It can be tediously repetitive, error-prone and, due to the many moving parts of a typical image pipeline, be expensive to self-host, support and scale.

In this workshop we will introduce you to the many advantages of image optimization, discuss use cases, and even show you a few advanced options.

Link to slides: TBD Link to video: TBD

Presented at:

  • Fastly Altitude NYC - March, 2017

Creating Better Function Interfaces in Rust

Abstract: Rust has a powerful type system, but do you know how to create good interfaces with those types? Rust’s ownership model can make it challenging to translate how a program works in your mental model to syntax that satisfies the Rust compiler. We do not need to contort our interfaces in order to satisfy the compiler. I will introduce some strategies for working with the DST/slice pattern using the Into trait and Cow enum. I will also show how lifetimes can be leveraged to create safer interfaces for resource access.

Link to slides: Google Doc Presentation

Presented at:

  • Rust Belt Rust Conference - October, 2016

copperline & nom

Abstract: I will introducing a way to be an interactive (REPL-like) approach to building a stockfighter.io application using copperline and nom. These are both powerful Rust crates that compliment each other well.

Link to slides: Google Doc Presentation

Presented at:

  • Los Angeles Rust Meetup - August, 2016

Rust: Systems Programming for Web Developers

Abstract: The modern web stack is made up of a dozen different systems, but too few people know how to create and support them. I believe this is because systems programming has historically had too many barriers to entry, such as memory safety and the trading of expressiveness for performance. Let us explore some of the ways Rust breaks down these barriers and can make systems programming feel much more approachable to web developers.

Presented at:

Anatomy of a PHP Request

Abstract: Come along on an adventure as we follow a request all the way through the web stack. You will catch a glimpse of the different startup and shutdown modes of PHP, figure out what the difference between mod_php and fpm are and learn other interesting tidbits of information as a request goes through its journey of being served.

Link to slides: Google Doc Presentation

Presented at:

  • SCALE 14x - January, 2016

Rust Lifetimes

Abstract: A complete walkthrough of lifetimes in Rust. This talk will take us from the basics of how lifetimes work, discuss why we may need to be explicit about them and end talking about advanced topics, such as higher-ranked lifetimes.

Link to slides: Google Doc Presentation

Presented at:

  • Los Angeles Rust Meetup - October, 2015

Rust: Systems Programming for Web Developers

Abstract: This a call to action for web developers to get involved in systems programming. The modern web stack is getting more complex, but too few people know how to create and support the essential elements of that stack. I believe this is because systems programming has historically had too many barriers to entry. Modern systems languages, like Rust, are breaking down these barriers. Ever wanted to write a toy shell or create your own version of memcache? Rust makes systems programming feel much more approachable to web developers.

Link to slides: Google Doc Presentation

Presented at:

  • Rust 1.0 Launch Party at UCLA - May, 2015
  • LAPHP: The Los Angeles PHP Developers Group - June, 2015
  • The Los Angeles Ruby/Rails Meetup Group - June, 2015

Panel: Capitalizing on Both HTML5 and Native Apps to Deliver Cost Effective Content

Panel focus: Mobile in 2013 has been a year of trial and error, testing and learning. Everyone is at different stages of their mobile ‘journey’. Lets start by asking- what are the fundamentals of a ‘good’ HTML5/app strategy, based on your experience so far? Who are we catering to? Is a no brainer to have an app? The panels next main focus can be how the audience can blend both HTML5 and apps into their mobile strategy, based on what is right for them. How did you find the sweet spot? What worked for HSN? What worked for Hautelook? How can some of those best practices be actually used by the audience? Lets talk more about pros and cons of each. It would be great to have a debate too around the ‘hybrid’ concept. It seemed to work for HSN, but not for Hautelook? Why/why not? Another good focus can be Phonegap and some of the less expensive methods of implementing strategy. What are the best options available? What worked well when working with solution providers and other internal teams? We can wrap up by discussing where we are in terms of where we see value for the future. What are the challenges ahead? How is responsive design changing the playing field? Where are the opportunities? How can we each take mobile to the next level?

Presented at:

  • Mobile Shopping Conference - April, 2013

Ember.js Build Processes

Abstract: A brief introduction to the tools available to build Ember.js applications. I also walk through how to use travis-CI and Amazon S3 to automatically build, test and deploy an Ember.js application.

Link to slides: Google Doc Presentation

Presented at:

  • Southern California Ember.js User Group - April, 2013

HAL - A Lean Hypermedia Type

Abstract: The web is made up links and forms that allow people to intuitively grasp how to navigate and interact with pages. Hypermedia APIs take traditional REST APIs provide them these same affordances. Hal is a simple hypermedia format that is built on top of JSON. The Hal hypermedia type allows API authors to link representations together to create an API that is more easily consumable by the client. As more and more of the technology around is powered by APIs, it is critical that we learn how to build them in a way that allows us for versioning, backwards compatibility and flexibility.

Link to slides: Google Doc Presentation

Presented at:

  • The Los Angeles Ruby/Rails Meetup Group - March, 2013

Emberpress Code Review

Abstract: A code review of the Emberpress Ember.js application written by Robin Ward (aka @eviltrout). This reviews the latest conventions used in the code to discuss with the meetup how and why they are used.

Link to slides: Google Doc Presentation

Presented at:

  • Southern California Ember.js User Group - February, 2013

Grokking HTTP Methods

Abstract: We have probably all heard of REST. It is currently the popular way to create APIs for internal and/or external use. Virtually all RESTful API’s are built on top of HTTP. Thus, it is important to understand how the different HTTP methods work. They are key to creating a solid RESTful API and offer so much more than simple CRUD. We will be taking a deep-dive into the HTTP methods and providing some foundation for further exploration of HTTP and how it relates to RESTful APIs.

Link to slides: Google Doc Presentation

Presented at:

  • Ventura PHP User Group - November, 2012